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of his war policy, it would not reach those people. in annual growth in india of 1%. indians understand what this order was all about. they wanted the confusion of independence. from may, 1947 is important because it is the modern 1776. america is the oldest country of the modern world. the american constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but re
and look at the issues that have to do with pakistan's relationship to india the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus become somewhat less on our relationship to counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media and other links with pakistan that has suffered in last 10 years because of our focus. i guess i come out out of your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that there were two things on the rails which if you know what happened over the last two years is not an easy thing. it was kind of like rolling down the side of the -- with rocks and cactus is is an you don't know how far the ripping go so when i see these keeping things on track it's not easy to keep things on track and pakistan is the way it is mismanaged and the difficulties in our relationship but if we are able to do so after 2014 there will be a prospect that we can open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision ba
's relations with india, the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus becomes somewhat less a relationship through counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media, other links with pakistan that have really suffered in the last 10 years because of our focus on ct pics i guess i come up to your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that if we can keep things on the risk in which if you know what happened over the last two years, it's not an easy thing, it was like rolling down the side of her routine with rocks and cactus is and you don't know how far the routine goes. so goes. so what is a keeping things on track, it is not easy to get things on track, pakistan. because of the way it's mismanaged, because of the difficulties in our relationship. but if we're able to do so i think after 2014 there would be a prospect that we can open up the new kind of cooperation, if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision, based on mistrust
's in negative territory, in the he's, china, india, and about the only things that the rest of the world likes about america are movie, tv, science, and technology. they are not keen on the democracy, as least as america preaches it. heading now into another four years of the obama administration where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? how do we live up to that promise? what went wrong? what's going right? what can we do about it going forward? >> simple. [laughter] well, fist of all, i don't think that favorability ratinging in the surveys are evidence of whether we are doing something wrong or right, and it's a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. while i guess maybe some of us in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure at the fact that in 2008 the favorability ratings for the united states were higher and four out of the five surveyed arab countries, i'm not going to bring that up. [laughter] no, but i think it -- i think it's a big mistake, and, you know, in my view, and
and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. you had latinos turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the fir
china and i india, and the sooner we have substitute fuels, and i think for the intermediate future anyway, that's natural gas. as long as we're careful how it's extracted, and it can be extracted safely, can be enormous advantage to us. we can use it through natural gas -- i was on a bus today in portland powered by compressed natural gas. you can -- we can use it to power electric vehicles. at the same time, there needs to be a parallel track with renewables to be there when the gas runs out, the demand increases to the point where the price goes up. to power a vehicle on natural gas is equivalent to $2 a gallon, and it would be the same for home heating. getting off the oil should be the number one priority, and we're finally in a position to do it. this has just come to us in the last four or five years. >> moderator: all right. senator dill? dill: thank you. certainly, gas prices are a challenge to any family in maine trying to get their kids to school, get to the store, or get to work. i do support the president's fuel efficiency standards that will lead to automobiles that re
to push all the money out into the economy that is in india, because everyone is afraid to stand. i'd just like to point out the great depression went on for more than 10 years after this rooseveltian seamers started but if you count the world war ii as a statement, which even barack obama's economic adviser, christina romer has refuted the idea that the war actually ended the depression, you know, none of that, the actual original failure of keynesian was during the depression and yet nobody saw that way. but if we're going to take that serious, take the idea that taking up slack in demand is what we need to do, how much do we need to spend? what is the dollar figure that government needs to put out? >> are you asking? >> yeah. >> there's a lot of debate about this. it's hard to come with a precise figure because we are human beings and we do the best -- >> the keynesians are the ones who believe that everything is trackable to these complex mathematical formulas with all kinds of greek letters and stuff. [inaudible] >> there was internal debate in the obama administration how big is the
with some optimism but a relatively close election. but one thing to note is all the votes are not india, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort o
was instrumental in opening up our opening of our relations with china and establishing new relations with india. he is in every sense the diplomat warrior what we most admire in our uniform, and our combat commander. i want to say thank you to bill, for you, for doing this, and let's turn this over to you. [applause] >> first big step. doctor, think you're much and welcome, ladies and gentlemen. while we are getting settled here, have our panelists come up and get settled into their chairs in order to serve. and for those of you that missed the chat line, it may be too late. [laughter] but then again, i don't think too many in israel are starting. not the same can be said for others in the world. i wanted to begin with first in case you missed the copies of this on the way in, recommended to your reading and perusal and safety john and steve, thanks for inviting me to participate here in this event. i never get into that in a minute what i think is really important. i'd also like to add my voice to the memory of trip to sell, who contributed as he did it so may things, to this effort just befor
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9